Gamma String Tension Tester
$19.99
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Track tension loss in your racquets as well as compare actual tension between strung racquets with the Gamma String Tension Tester.
  • Features a modern ergonomic design
  • Large scale allows for quick and easy readings
  • Know when it is time to restring
  • Easy to operate
  • Constructed of durable nylon material
Learning Center

Comments: I couldn't duplicate my results. I would use it on one of my racquets, record the readings on the strings I tested, then try it a few days later on the same racquet (which had just been sitting in a closet, and not played with) and I would get different numbers for the same strings. I don't use it anymore. My guess is that friction from the humps in the stringbed causes a randomness in the readings.
From: Kendra, San Francisco. 4/10

Comments: It is a great tool to check tension loss in a string job. This tool is particularly essential for poly strings as they tend to kill your elbow after they go dead. STI is not lb so those guys saying that this tester is not accurate really don't know what they are talking about.
From: Terry, NJ, US 02/10

Comments: I strung a yonex 400 long last night at 65 with my klippermate and the gamma sti reading is 50 STI (NOTE: it's STI, not pounds). I then mesured a blx tour 90 demo Ii got from a pro shop and it says 48. So, I think the reading is consistent. What you shouldn't do is think that STI = lbs. STI is another form of measuring unit. You mark that to make sure you string ur racket consistently at that STI. Once the STI drops 6 or more units, you can change strings (if they haven't broke yet)
From: Sach, Orange, CA 02/10

Comments: I found this product to be quite useful. I know you cant get a 100% acurate reading but once used correctly you will find consistency in the readings. People that get upset with this tensioner, shouldn't expect miracles out of a $20 item.
From: M.Marotta, Melbourne, Vic, Australia 01/10

Comments: It's physics. This tester measures the force required to extend a string a given length. The longer the string, the lower the force required to get the same extension. (e.g. It is easier to stretch a 6 ft long string by 1 in. than to extend the same 1 in. from a 3 in. long string. Notice that the meter says to use it on the middle string. Second, the friction at the cross points increases the resistance of the string to be stretched. So will do the string texture, the bed stenciling or the string savers. If you want to verify the tester accuracy, test the middle string WITHOUT the cross strings on. I normally pick a string (preferably the middle string) and compare readings at the same point over time. Another useful application I found for this tester is to record the readings on several symmetrical points with respect to the middle string. If the racquet was properly strung the values should closely match.
From: Louis Patt, Phoenixville, PA, USA, 01/10

Comments: This thing is terrible. I returned mine. Here's why: 1. Widely inconsistent readings. Lets face it, if you're buying one of these, you're analytical and looking for both accuracy and precision out of measurements. You'll get neither. I tried this on two racquets that had been strung 10lbs (62 and 52) apart with less than 3 hours of play on each. Taking multiple readings for the different racquets, there were times when the 52 measured tighter than the 62 and vice-versa. A distribution of readings was so broad as to be non-informative. 2. The scale seems arbitrary. It's not lbs/sq inch or anything. It's just "40" (40 "whats" I have no idea). So even if you could get consistency out of readings - there's no translation into a real-world scale. 3. There's very little instruction. Maybe there is a way to get consistency - but it's not evident for what should be a simple tool. /waves magic jedi hand/ "this is not the product your looking for." Move on."
From: Alex, Northern VA, USA, 01/10

Comments: At first I thought that this thing is useless until I finally worked out how to use it properly. It isn't designed to give a super accurate reading, and when I tried it on a freshly strung racquet it was extremely close - so I mainly use it to get a rough indication of the tension loss on my racquets. Also the idea is to check different places on the racquet too as it is quite common for tension to vary across the bed, although not too much.
From: Nathan, Melbourne, Australia. 11/09

Comments: This is a very nice tool for people with his own stringing machine. After a fresh string job (60+lb), it usually measures 45 on the meter. After first 2-3 hours hit, the tension usually decreases to around 40. If it eventually decreases to below 35, I usually cut the string. The previous feedback from John is wrong! you have to straddle on 1 cross to get a correct measure. Otherwise the meter will touch 2 crosses which add a lot of resistance. That's why John's method is incorrect.
From: Mike, New Jersey 07/09

Comments: I found that if I use the tester per the manufacturer's instructions, it always shows around 40lbs of tension no matter what I strung at. If I don't straddle a cross string as shown in the instructions, it is dead on what I strung my racquets at. I have tested this on 6 different racquets, and it has been accurate every time as long as I don't straddle a cross string.
From: John , Ft. Worth, TX, USA. 06/09

Comments: I found that if I use the tester per the manufacturer's instructions, it always shows around 40lbs of tension no matter what I strung at. If I don't straddle a cross string as shown in the instructions, it is dead on what I strung my racquets at. I have tested this on 6 different racquets, and it has been accurate every time as long as I don't straddle a cross string.
From: John, Ft. Worth, TX USA 06/09

Comments: The tester works correctly and allows to compare string tension loss on your racquet properly. You can't measure real tension but have a reasonable measure of the percentage of loss tension for a string.
From: Gabriele, Cesena - FC - ITALY. 3/09

Comments: This thing is A WASTE OF MONEY! It costs $20 to find that all it does is to find how much tension you lose. It's inaccurate! Here are my 5 readings: 40,45, 44,39, 37. I strung my rackets at 65/68 instead of 37-45.
From: Anonymous, Texas. 3/09

Comments: I was hoping to be able to determine what the actual tension was of the string bed when I purchased the device. Unfortunately, the device doesn't record actual tension, so there is no way to tell what the string bed tension is. The directions also note that stenciling and textured strings also influence the reading, so that also presents a problem. I tested multiple racquets using the recommended method and the readings were inconsistent.
From: T.A. Niles, Fort Myers, FL, USA, 11/08
My USTA NTRP rating 5.0